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Strong partnerships, Technology Contracting ensured Tom Benson Hall of Fame Stadium was ready for Enshrinement Week Powered by Johnson Controls

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by Johnson Controls Any football team attempting a two-minute drill knows how critical it is for players to understand their assignments and execute flawlessly to secure a successful outcome with no time to spare. That same mind-set among the partners involved in the development of Tom Benson Hall of Fame Stadium at the Johnson...

by Johnson Controls

Any football team attempting a two-minute drill knows how critical it is for players to understand their assignments and execute flawlessly to secure a successful outcome with no time to spare. That same mind-set among the partners involved in the development of Tom Benson Hall of Fame Stadium at the Johnson Controls Hall of Fame Village is what allowed the stadium to be ready for the Pro Football Hall of Fame Enshrinement Week Powered by Johnson Controls in record time.

This one-of-a-kind sports and entertainment complex is home to a stadium that was recently profiled as one of the “13 Game-Changing NFL Stadiums” by Forbes. It was largely completed in just ten months, in time to host Enshrinement Week Powered by Johnson Controls activities including the Hall of Fame Game, Enshrinement and Concert for Legends. (Continuing work on the venue will include the addition of a concourse and permanent seating in the east end zone, as well as cabanas, an 80-foot scoreboard and ribbon boards. This final phase will be completed in 2018.)

No “Hail Mary” needed The partners in the project knew their roles and the game plan, and, with shared vision, values, integrity and plenty of trust in their teammates, they were able to come together to deliver the desired outcomes. Johnson Controls’ partners — the Pro Football Hall of Fame, developer Industrial Realty Group, technology architect and program manager TSAV (Technical Services Audio Visual), and the architectural firm, HKS, all agreed — at the heart of this project was the integrity that all the partners exhibited from the design to the construction to the technology that created a world-class experience in the stadium.

“The distinction was the integrity behind the project. It’s not something that is talked about, it’s worked into the construction process and design,” said Peter Dugas, principal and senior consultant, TSAV. TSAV’s Dugas credits early involvement by the owners, even prior to the programming stage, with helping the team understand what motivated the owners’ decisions, and that allowed the team to deliver the desired outcomes. Explained Dugas, “The owners needed to have a commitment to a level of engagement in order to understand how the technologies interconnect, and how that in turn would affect possible outcomes. For the stadium project, technologies needed to be integrated in a way that is not typical to a construction project.” Special projects require special skillsets.

Johnson Controls served as technology contractor for the stadium project. As a primary point of contact during construction, Johnson Controls, in partnership with TSAV, was able to bring an enterprise-wide perspective to managing the planning, design, installation, integration, commissioning and service of technology systems, business applications and supporting infrastructure. The partners agree that the coordinated approach used by Johnson Controls simplified, optimized and reduced technology cost and risk, saving time and decreasing construction and operating costs, while ensuring that technology was deployed and integrated in an orderly manner to achieve desired outcomes.


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TSAV, Pro Football Hall of Fame, IRG Team to Deliver "One of One" Smart Sports & Entertainment City & The Largest Naming Rights Agreement of 2016

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http://www.forbes.com/sites/mi...

"We travel around to different stadiums every week, and this place is rockin'!"

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TSAV completed the renovations to the sound system in the University of Georgia's Sanford Stadium in the summer of 2014, and recently received some pretty cool praise from a CBS Sports correspondent. Noah Spangler, a Producer at CBS Sports commented, "We travel around to different stadiums every week, and this place is rockin'!". The...

TSAV completed the renovations to the sound system in the University of Georgia's Sanford Stadium in the summer of 2014, and recently received some pretty cool praise from a CBS Sports correspondent. Noah Spangler, a Producer at CBS Sports commented, "We travel around to different stadiums every week, and this place is rockin'!". The comment was made this past weekend during the Georgia-Alabama game which aired on CBS.

For more information on the Sanford Stadium project, check out the project page here.


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TSAV Project Featured in ENR Southeast

Young Harris Campus Center

Best Higher Education/Research: Young Harris College Rollins Campus Center For its new 121,000-sq-ft campus center, Young Harris College urged builders and designers to incorporate “smart” and sustainable design elements. The result, the Rollins Campus Center, in Young Harris, Ga., features a 60,000-sq-ft multipurpose...

Best Higher Education/Research: Young Harris College Rollins Campus Center


For its new 121,000-sq-ft campus center, Young Harris College urged builders and designers to incorporate “smart” and sustainable design elements. The result, the Rollins Campus Center, in Young Harris, Ga., features a 60,000-sq-ft multipurpose student center, a 40,000-sq-ft library, a 500-seat dining facility, a 350-seat banquet area and other amenities. The building aims to earn LEED Gold certification.

To meet that goal of being smart and sustainable, designers incorporated a computer in the building manager’s office that controls the entire facility, including the locking/unlocking of doors, lights and temperature. Lighting is controlled by LED sensors; appliances are low energy/low heat; and all of the building’s water sources are sensor-controlled to aid conservation. Designers also incorporated extra-thick window glass, roof insulation and doors to aid heating and cooling. Geothermal cooling wells  boost the project’s energy efficiency.

Contractors had to be as efficient as possible with materials deliveries, too. Due to class schedules, materials suppliers could only make project deliveries before 9 a.m. or after 4 p.m. To compensate for insufficient parking space for workers, contractor Choate Construction set up offsite subcontractor parking and established a defined transport schedule to get workers to the site.

During the course of construction, contractors endured one of the area’s worst winters on record, losing a total of 192 days to weather. Nevertheless, crews were able to complete the project on time.

For more visit: http://www.enr.com/articles/37...

PHOTO: CLEAR SKY PHOTOGRAPHY

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TSAV Achieves APEx Status

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TSAV Achieves InfoComm International AV Provider of Excellence Distinction ATHENS, GA – September, 2015 – TSAV has qualified as an InfoComm International AV Provider of Excellence, or APEx. The InfoComm APEx program is a marketing recognition program for integration companies and AV design consulting firms dedicated...

TSAV Achieves InfoComm International AV Provider of Excellence Distinction

ATHENS, GA September, 2015 – TSAV has qualified as an InfoComm International AV Provider of Excellence, or APEx. The InfoComm APEx program is a marketing recognition program for integration companies and AV design consulting firms dedicated to upholding industry excellence by providing quality service to customers.

The InfoComm APEx program recognizes companies based on the number of employees holding key industry certifications, including InfoComm’s CTS credential, completion of continuing education classes, and positive customer survey responses. APEx providers must also prove that they meet or exceed the requirements within 2 ANSI/INFOCOMM standards, the Standard Guide for Audiovisual Systems Design and Coordination Processesand the AV System Performance Verification Standard, to foster better communication between the AV provider and the client.

“The APEx designation gives AV companies a mark of distinction in the marketplace,” said David Labuskes, CTS, RCDD, InfoComm International’s Executive Director and Chief Executive Officer. “Customers of APEx companies can be confident of the AV provider’s professionalism and commitment to ongoing training, customer service and dedication to excellence.”

"We're honored to be recognized by Infocomm as one of the hardest working AV companies in the industry. As the president of TSAV, I'm thankful to work with people who strive to improve and grow every day by their efforts and dedication to the highest standards across the board. We look forward to continue to better serve our customers and strive for excellence in everything we do." – Pete Dugas, President

For more information on the APEx Program, visit infocomm.org/APEx.

ABOUT TSAV

At TSAV, we believe that our work can facilitate empowerment and enhance delivery of our clients' messages. In short, we facilitate communication through leading technology related projects. We integrate hardware, software, and place within an organization's goals. We explore the possibilities derived from innovative design practices. We magnify the impact of the message, sometimes through amplification and sometimes through streamlining, refinement, and method. TSAV is a full -service professional communications technology consulting firm specializing in technology roadmapping, ROI quantification, infrastructure design, project management, consulting, integration, programming, service and support for AV, IT, and technology projects.

ABOUT INFOCOMM INTERNATIONAL

InfoComm International® is the international trade association representing the professional audiovisual and information communications industries. InfoComm has more than 5,000 members, including manufacturers, systems integrators, dealers and distributors, independent consultants, programmers, rental and staging companies, end users and multimedia professionals from more than 80 countries. InfoComm International is the leading resource for AV standards, market research and news. Its training, certification and education programs set a standard of excellence for AV professionals. InfoComm International is the founder of InfoComm, the largest annual conference and exhibition for AV buyers and sellers in North America. InfoComm also produces trade shows in Europe, the Middle East, China and Latin America. Additional information is available at www.infocomm.org.

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TSAV Provides Large Format LED Display for UGA Football Program

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TSAV was able to provide the University of Georgia's Football Program with a large format LED display as a background for their recent preseason photo shoot. The board was used to display crisp, clear backdrops for the shoot, from which pictures will be used for the coming 2015 college football season. To any UGA football fans out...

TSAV was able to provide the University of Georgia's Football Program with a large format LED display as a background for their recent preseason photo shoot. The board was used to display crisp, clear backdrops for the shoot, from which pictures will be used for the coming 2015 college football season. To any UGA football fans out there, be sure to be on the lookout for these in gameday programs and on the big screen this season!

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Western Province, Saudi Arabia KAUST: King Abdullah University of Science and Technology

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The KAUST campus and community site is located on the Red Sea, adjacent to the fishing village of Thuwal and 80 kilometers (50 miles) north of Jeddah, Saudi Arabia's second largest city. The total area comprises more than 36 million square meters, including the University campus, Harbor District commercial center, three distinct...

The KAUST campus and community site is located on the Red Sea, adjacent to the fishing village of Thuwal and 80 kilometers (50 miles) north of Jeddah, Saudi Arabia's second largest city. The total area comprises more than 36 million square meters, including the University campus, Harbor District commercial center, three distinct residential neighborhoods. TSAV was asked to design and integrate AV systems for KAUST. The project scope includes elaborate AV functionality in classrooms, auditoriums, multipurpose spaces, conference rooms, production studios, training rooms, and lab spaces as well as the integration of an enterprise level distance learning platform.

The most unique and exciting part of the project involves the analytics element. TSAV integrated an enterprise IPTV and a blended learning management system that utilizes content capture and analytical system feedback designed to provide for effectiveness datas related to students, faculty, and content.


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Western Province, Saudi Arabia, AMEA KAUST: King Abdullah University of Science and Technology

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The KAUST campus and community site is located on the Red Sea, adjacent to the fishing village of Thuwal and 80 kilometers (50 miles) north of Jeddah, Saudi Arabia's second largest city. The total area comprises more than 36 million square meters, including the University campus, Harbor District commercial center, three distinct...

The KAUST campus and community site is located on the Red Sea, adjacent to the fishing village of Thuwal and 80 kilometers (50 miles) north of Jeddah, Saudi Arabia's second largest city. The total area comprises more than 36 million square meters, including the University campus, Harbor District commercial center, three distinct residential neighborhoods. TSAV was asked to design and integrate AV systems for KAUST. The project scope includes elaborate AV functionality in classrooms, auditoriums, multipurpose spaces, conference rooms, production studios, training rooms, and lab spaces as well as the integration of an enterprise level distance learning platform.

The most unique and exciting part of the project involves the analytics element. TSAV integrated an enterprise IPTV and a blended learning management system that utilizes content capture and analytical system feedback designed to provide for effectiveness datas related to students, faculty, and content.

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TSAV Earns "Rock Star" Status

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Award-winning TSAV a reflection of Athens By CHRIS STARRS - NEWS@ONLINEATHENS.COM - published Saturday, March 21, 2015 Pete Dugas, president of Athens-based TSAV, did not take pause to celebrate earlier this week when his company was one of seven firms named Small Business Rock Stars by the Georgia Department of Economic Development...

Award-winning TSAV a reflection of Athens

By CHRIS STARRS - NEWS@ONLINEATHENS.COM - published Saturday, March 21, 2015

Pete Dugas, president of Athens-based TSAV, did not take pause to celebrate earlier this week when his company was one of seven firms named Small Business Rock Stars by the Georgia Department of Economic Development and the Georgia Economic Developers Association.

“We don’t have a lot of time to slow down for much,” Dugas (pronounced do-gah) said on Thursday.

In fact, Dugas — who founded TSAV in Athens in 1991 — wasn’t even at the awards luncheon held Monday in Atlanta because he was too busy doing business elsewhere. But he pronounced himself pleased with the recognition.

“My first question was, ‘Well, what does that mean?’” Dugas quipped. “Knowing who is bestowing that honor made it pretty startling, actually. I was amazed to be included in the group being considered, but to actually be part of the winners was amazing. We must be doing something right.”

These days, it seems TSAV, which stands for Technical Services Audio Video, is doing quite a bit right — all around the world. The technology systems integration company, which also has offices in Atlanta and Macon, has a diverse roster of fascinating high-tech projects, providing support in the fields of education, justice, athletics, communications and transportation, to name but a few.

Dugas says the most notable projects in which TSAV is presently involved include an aircraft initiative for the U.S. Marine Corps, evidence presentation and video arraignment systems for several courthouses, work for the Federal Reserve, and work at the University of West Georgia as well as at the new facilities of UGA’s Terry College of Business.

And the company has a lengthy list of completed and ongoing projects that include the upgraded audio system at Sanford Stadium (and similar systems at Foley Field and in Stegeman Coliseum), the sound system at the Auburn Arena. Overseas in Saudi Arabia, TSAV is rendering a host of services in the development of the King Abdullah University of Science & Technology and for Thuwal, the city that surrounds the institute.

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Highlights of TSAV's Collaboration with New Trier High School

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TSAV’s President Presents at InfoComm Integrated Systems Europe in Amsterdam

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TSAV was proud to support InfoComm Integrated Systems Europe, where Pete Dugas, CTS, CTS-D, AIA Afil and Instructor Emeritus and Adjunct Faculty InfoComm University, presented as part of the education series.

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It’s true, this site doesn’t have a whole lot of content yet, but don’t worry. Our web developers have just installed the CMS, and they’re setting things up for the content editors this very moment. Soon Tsav.local will be an oasis of fresh perspectives, sharp analyses, and astute opinions that will keep you coming back again...

It’s true, this site doesn’t have a whole lot of content yet, but don’t worry. Our web developers have just installed the CMS, and they’re setting things up for the content editors this very moment. Soon Tsav.local will be an oasis of fresh perspectives, sharp analyses, and astute opinions that will keep you coming back again and again.

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VSU Celebrates Opening of Health Sciences and Business Administration Building

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April 20, 2014 By: Thressea Boyd, Director of Communications VALDOSTA-- Valdosta State University held a ribbon cutting ceremony for the Health Sciences and Business Administration (HSBA) building on Friday, April 18, at the Rea and Lillian Steele North Campus. The ceremony included remarks from VSU President William J...

April 20, 2014

By: Thressea Boyd, Director of Communications

VALDOSTA-- Valdosta State University held a ribbon cutting ceremony for the Health Sciences and Business Administration (HSBA) building on Friday, April 18, at the Rea and Lillian Steele North Campus.

The ceremony included remarks from VSU President William J. McKinney, Georgia Secretary of State Brian Kemp, Georgia Attorney General Sam Olens, Georgia Senator Tim Golden, former VSU President Ronald M. Zaccari, and former VSU Interim President Louis Levy. Following the ceremony, guests were invited to tour the facility.

"As we continue to build a more engaged and innovative Valdosta State, our Health Sciences and Business Administration building will serve as one of Georgia's premier academic facilities designed to educate future health care professionals," said VSU President William J. McKinney. "The programs housed inside the HSBA building are the cornerstone for our focus on comprehensive health care education, allowing us to expand partnerships and collaborations with South Georgia Medical Center and other regional health care providers, enhancing economic development through applied research and business partnerships, and improving the quality of life for South Georgia residents."

The $32 million, approximately 150,000-square-foot structure houses six health professions programs: nursing, athletic training, exercise physiology, communication sciences and disorders, social work, and health care administration. The building will also include a dental hygiene program in partnership with Wiregrass Georgia Technical College.

Previously housed in five different buildings across campus, the HSBA building allows students and faculty to engage in cross-disciplinary discussions and research, in addition to expanding interaction with health professionals at South Georgia Medical Center and other health agencies.

The HSBA building has allowed the Langdale College of Business Administration to introduce a new Bachelor of Business Administration and online Master of Business Administration in health care administration. In May 2013, Communication and Sciences Disorders was approved to offer a Doctor of Speech-Language Pathology, to address the needs of professionals at the service, administration, and clinical research level. In addition, the HSBA building will provide space for development of a doctorate in nursing, a master's degree in exercise physiology, and a bachelor's degree in social work.

The HSBA building was designed by Heery International and Ellis, Ricket and Associates (ERA), the building was designed for LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certification. Lovell Engineering provided civil engineering services and Doran and Karwoski provided landscape design.

VSU's Office of Communications has developed an online media kit that includes videos and articles about the HSBA and the programs housed in the building. Visit the website http://blog.valdosta.edu/hsba/ or call Office of Communications 229-333-2157.

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Nuci's Space - TSAV Rocks for a Good Cause

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For the fourth year in a row, TSAV's in-house band will compete against over twenty other local business bands at the Athens Business Rocks fundraiser to benefit local non-profit musician health and resource center, Nuci's Space. Made up of audiovisual salespeople, technicians, and engineers, TSAV's own "Punchlist" won second place...

For the fourth year in a row, TSAV's in-house band will compete against over twenty other local business bands at the Athens Business Rocks fundraiser to benefit local non-profit musician health and resource center, Nuci's Space. Made up of audiovisual salespeople, technicians, and engineers, TSAV's own "Punchlist" won second place in last year's competition and third place in 2012 as one of the top ten fundraisers. (You may have seen the gold album hanging in our office!) This year, Punchlist will cover some Hall and Oates tunes and features the following band members:

Nick Robbins – Vocals
Joe Attaway – Vocals
Jason Roach – Guitar
Steve Gore – Drums
Stephen Simmons – Bass
Luke "Gnarly G" Powell – Sax, Vocals
Dave Spivey – Keys, Vocals
Sarah Robbins – Vocals

Would you consider supporting our efforts this year? We are tuning our guitars and warming up our amps for a good cause. Your contribution would be much appreciated by all the folks involved here at TSAV and at Nuci's Space. And if you happen to be in town, please feel free to come to the show!

To make a donation, learn more about Nuci's space, or find this year's schedule, please follow this link and vote for TSAV.

http://athensbusinessrocks.com/

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TSAV Celebrates LEED Gold Certification with Western Carolina University

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WCU building receives LEED gold certification BILL STUDENC DECEMBER 12, 2013 Western Carolina University’s Health and Human Sciences Building has become the university’s first structure to be LEED-certified for its comprehensive energy-efficient and...

WCU building receives LEED gold certification

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DECEMBER 12, 2013

Western Carolina University’s Health and Human Sciences Building has become the university’s first structure to be LEED-certified for its comprehensive energy-efficient and environmentally friendly features.
The U.S. Green Building Council recently awarded the four-story, 160,000 square-foot building, which opened in 2012, LEED, or Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, certification at the second highest possible level – gold. The certification was based on an assessment of the building project in five categories – sustainable site, water efficiency, energy and atmosphere, materials and resources, indoor environmental quality and innovation in design.

“Our initial goal was for the building to be certified at least at the silver level, but as the design and construction process continued and new LEED points were defined, the architects worked very hard to gather information to obtain the gold certification,” said Galen May, university architect.

Designed by architects with the firm of PBC+L (now Clark Nexsen), the Health and Human Sciences Building is nestled into a mountainside in a way that minimizes environmental impact and includes such features as reflective surfaces on the roof and a rooftop garden to keep heat absorption at bay. The orientation of windows and the sun screens on the building’s exterior maximize natural daylight to reduce energy needs for lighting and are positioned to reduce the need for heating and air conditioning. Other green design elements range from using regional products to incorporating water conservation measures.

“Our unique location and educational mission makes our campus a great living laboratory for engaging our students, faculty and staff in regards to sustainability,” said Lauren R. Bishop, chief sustainability officer at WCU. “We strive to create healthy learning environments. What better way to achieve this goal than with an actual building? Americans spend an average of 90 percent of their time indoors. If we can build a green building that helps to connect us with the outdoors, is energy efficient and provides comfortable spaces for educating our community, then we are making the right choice for creating a sustainable and resilient campus.”

The Health and Human Sciences Building was constructed to bring under one roof students and faculty from disciplines including nursing, physical therapy, communication sciences and disorders, social work, athletic training, emergency medical care, environmental health, nutrition and dietetics, and recreational therapy. The facility features customized classrooms and seminar rooms, and 21 specialized labs that serve more than 1,200 undergraduate students and 300 graduate students in diverse high-demand, health-related programs.

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Pete Dugas Named to InfoComm Academy Faculty

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Oct 31, 2013 by InfoComm AUDIOVISUAL INDUSTRY EXPERT TO PROVIDE STUDENTS WITH HIGH-QUALITY INSTRUCTION FAIRFAX, VA –October 30, 2013 – InfoComm International, the leading trade association representing the commercial audiovisual industry, has announced that Pete Dugas of TSAV has been awarded status as an Adjunct Faculty...

Oct 31, 2013 by InfoComm

AUDIOVISUAL INDUSTRY EXPERT TO PROVIDE STUDENTS WITH HIGH-QUALITY INSTRUCTION

FAIRFAX, VA –October 30, 2013 – InfoComm International, the leading trade association representing the commercial audiovisual industry, has announced that Pete Dugas of TSAV has been awarded status as an Adjunct Faculty Instructor for InfoComm University.

The Faculty Program was created to recognize the contributions of its dedicated instructors and to contribute to the professional development of those providing instruction to the audiovisual industry. In doing so, InfoComm provides students with the highest quality training from the industry's technical experts. Faculty members are nominated by the InfoComm Professional Education and Training Committee (PETC), with final selections made by the association's Board of Directors. There are three levels of the Faculty Program: Adjunct Faculty, University Faculty and Senior University Faculty. There is also an honorary title of Instructor Emeritus.

As Adjunct Faculty, Mr. Dugas is required to present at least two hours of instruction a year. In recognition of his Adjunct status, Mr. Dugas is bestowed a certificate of honor.
Adjunct Faculty have their name is posted on the InfoComm web portal at www.infocomm.org.

InfoComm's audiovisual education and certification programs are the AV industry's leading professional development resource. InfoComm University offers an extensive range of AV courses designed and taught by InfoComm's expert faculty members representing the entire spectrum of technical and professional disciplines.

Courses are taken online, at the Fairfax, Virginia, headquarters, at regional events around the world, and at the InfoComm tradeshow. On any given day there are more than 3,000 students enrolled in InfoComm training and certification.

"InfoComm University's mission is to support AV industry excellence through the training of professionals in need of advancing or updating their skills," said Melissa Taggart, InfoComm Senior Vice President for Education and Certification. "Thanks to the strong contributions and expertise of our faculty, we are continuing to serve these goals."

About InfoComm International

InfoComm International® is the international trade association representing the professional audiovisual and information communications industries. Established in 1939, InfoComm has more than 5,000 members, including manufacturers, systems integrators, dealers and distributors, independent consultants, programmers, rental and staging companies, end-users and multimedia professionals from more than 80 countries. InfoComm International is the leading resource for AV standards, market research and news. Its training, certification and education programs set a standard of excellence for AV professionals. InfoComm International is the founder of InfoComm, the largest annual conference and exhibition for AV buyers and sellers worldwide. InfoComm also produces trade shows in Europe, Asia and China.

Additional information is available at http://infocomm.org.

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Affordable, Effective, Collaborative "Classroom of the Future"

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The potential for educational institutions to cut costs by rethinking the logistics of their digital learning initiatives has often been overlooked. As digital learning gains traction as both a highly effective and economically viable educational platform, options for cutting costs and improving efficiency are steadily increasing...

The potential for educational institutions to cut costs by rethinking the logistics of their digital learning initiatives has often been overlooked. As digital learning gains traction as both a highly effective and economically viable educational platform, options for cutting costs and improving efficiency are steadily increasing. We evaluate your district's specific situation and advise you how to maximize your digital resources. We design an integrated hardware and software solution that employs practical approaches to provide personalized learning experiences to each student.

When the Clarke County School District first came to TSAV for consulting services, their primary goals concerned both physical logistics and the contractual burdens of their existing relationships with hardware and software providers. Over the years, they had integrated digital learning programs into their curriculum, and at that time the options for available providers were relatively limited compared to the options available today. As digital learning started to become the standard, many more hardware and software options became available. However, the district was bound to their existing hardware and software providers and thus were unable to reap the benefits of increasingly competitive costs for digital learning capabilities. As a result, they faced unnecessarily high costs associated with existing contracts and quickly realized that the longer-term budgetary implications would prove unsustainable. We had to address the following questions.

  • How can we improve on the efficiency of existing digital learning capabilities and simultaneously lower costs to the client?
  • How do we incorporate digital learning at home as well as within the classroom?
  • How do we accurately measure the results to determine if what we have done is truly effective?

The Solution: Accounting for Everything, One Thing at a Time

With the primary goal of finding a creative way to align their budget more closely with current market prices, we analyzed all of the district's existing hardware and software needs. In turn, we were able to pinpoint a number of solutions that would reduce the out-of-pocket expenses associated with their existing workflows and minimize dependencies on proprietary hardware and software. Among others, we presented them with workarounds to the following fundamental problems:

1. Problem

The physical wiring of each room did not allow teachers sufficient mobility with their workstations. As a result, expensive infrastructure was required, including ongoing maintenance fees due to recurrent damages to connective wiring. This produced a defined long-term cost of implementation.

Solution

We connected each room to a wireless network and connected an additional small form factor computer to each projector system, allowing teachers to connect to the classroom presentation system remotely. With that, the need for external wires was eliminated, thus considerably reducing ongoing maintenance costs and improving mobility. This also made more funds available for small-group learning opportunities and project-based initiatives. In effect, this technology untethers teachers and untethers students, resulting in a dynamic and mobile learning environment.

2. Problem

Based on the terms of their existing partnerships with software and hardware providers, the district assumed they were limited to the resources available through proprietary components.

Solution

With extensive experience in optimizing digital learning programs for educational institutions, we were able to direct the district to a number of free resources, compatible with their existing interfaces, which did not require the authorization of parent companies and in turn, resulted in significant cost savings compounded over time.

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TSAV Celebrates with University of West Georgia

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In celebration of the University of West Georgia's acceptance of the “Design & Technology" award from the Board of Regents for the Nursing Building, TSAV asked Senior A/V Engineer Keith Reardigan to discuss the A/V design process that contributed to the success of this technology rich project. TSAV is honored to contribute to the...

In celebration of the University of West Georgia's acceptance of the “Design & Technology" award from the Board of Regents for the Nursing Building, TSAV asked Senior A/V Engineer Keith Reardigan to discuss the A/V design process that contributed to the success of this technology rich project. TSAV is honored to contribute to the success of current and future nursing students at UWG.

As the senior design engineer at TSAV, Keith Reardigan shares his insight into why the project was such a success as well as his ideas about project management and design. His hard work on the project is an inspiration to all of us here at TSAV.

Why do you think this project was so successful?

“From a design perspective, the project was successful because we had to design the project twice. The systems were originally designed as analog video systems, and then the project was shelved. When the project came alive again, we were on the eve of the “analog sunset", so I recommended that the systems be redesigned to accommodate digital video as well as analog. Since we had two design rounds on the project, we realized better ways to do things in the second round.

Ultimately the success was due to the collaborative efforts of the design and installation teams. We really had a great owner advocate in Mike Conley at UWG, and Smith Dalia Architects were fantastic about involving us in field alterations and coordination during the design development and construction phases of the project. Lastly, but not least Unified AV, the Audio Visual Contractor was detail oriented and able to overcome unexpected field conditions and maintain design requirements as the project progressed."

What was one of the more challenging aspects of the project, and how did you overcome it?

“The most challenging aspect of this project was the coordination of data requirements. The campus had not had an AV Systems Design implemented on their campus networks that was as network heavy as the Nursing Building Design. The capture and video conferencing systems rely heavily on the owner's installed data network. The coordination needed to ensure that all physical outlets were provided as required and took multiple verification site visits and documentation rounds."

What was the one most valuable lesson to be learned from this particular project?

“Infrastructure inspections should be contracted to the AV Designer-Consultant, so the Consultant can verify the infrastructure will support the AV Design intent prior to releasing the design for bid. If the infrastructure that is provided requires the AV Design to be modified based on infrastructure conditions, the AV Consultant can do this modification proactively before an AV Contractor is awarded the project. This step will mitigate the potential for delays in the AV Integration Phase."

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TSAV Selected for Veterinary Medicine Teaching Hospital Project

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By Melissa McIver - Jan 8, 2013 - TSAV has been selected to provide AV and technology related services for the College of Veterinary Medicine's Teaching Hospital project. In conjunction with the Office of University Architects, Perkins & Will, and theCOVM team, we've begun work in developing systems & support requirements and...

By Melissa McIver - Jan 8, 2013 - TSAV has been selected to provide AV and technology related services for the College of Veterinary Medicine's Teaching Hospital project. In conjunction with the Office of University Architects, Perkins & Will, and theCOVM team, we've begun work in developing systems & support requirements and look forward to executing successfully, building the COVM's track record of success in implementing advanced technologies. We recently celebrated with those involved at the topping off ceremony.

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TSAV's President presents at Society for College & University Planners on Innovation & Pedagogy

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Maximizing resources and Innovative Technology to create Cutting Edge Transformational Teaching and Learning spaces Nov 2, 2012 by Melissa Mciver Evolving pedagogy and technology savvy students impose transformative demands on Hallowed academic spaces such as classrooms and libraries. To serve needs with scarce resources, we have...

Maximizing resources and Innovative Technology to create Cutting Edge Transformational Teaching and Learning spaces

Nov 2, 2012 by Melissa Mciver

Evolving pedagogy and technology savvy students impose transformative demands on Hallowed academic spaces such as classrooms and libraries. To serve needs with scarce resources, we have applied a model that utilizes existing space stock, incorporates cutting edge technology in selected classrooms prototypes for experiential teaching, learning and outreach, and combines learning, discovery, social functions and community outreach in the library .
Using and developing Champions and Project Advocates and collaboration with IT, Facilities and Academic groups conceptual and physical renovations resulting in transformational experiences have been implemented.

This presentation addressed the process and the resulting Classroom prototypes and Library spaces and was a great success.

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TSAV's President presents at GITEX/INFOCOMM Dubai on Simulation Systems

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Sep 24, 2012 by Melissa Mciver TSAV is proud to support InfoComm MEA 2012, where Pete DugasCTS, CTS-D will present as part of the education series. Pete's presentation will cover how changes in pedagogy are driving opportunities to maximize the effectiveness of AV & IT Systems, and how to respond to these changes with...

Sep 24, 2012 by Melissa Mciver

TSAV is proud to support InfoComm MEA 2012, where Pete DugasCTS, CTS-D will present as part of the education series. Pete's presentation will cover how changes in pedagogy are driving opportunities to maximize the effectiveness of AV & IT Systems, and how to respond to these changes with simulation & skills assessment environment designs.

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Georgia State Contract Announcement

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Jul 30, 2012 by Melissa Mciver TSAV is excited to announce that the Georgia State contract (99999-SPD-SPD0000048-0012) for video conferencing and AV products/services has been finalized and awarded. We are searchable under our parent name Dusoul Company, Inc. This contract allows TSAV to expedite the purchasing process for all State of...

Jul 30, 2012 by Melissa Mciver

TSAV is excited to announce that the Georgia State contract (99999-SPD-SPD0000048-0012) for video conferencing and AV products/services has been finalized and awarded. We are searchable under our parent name Dusoul Company, Inc. This contract allows TSAV to expedite the purchasing process for all State of Georgia Institutions, making it easier on you to focus on your mission, while not worrying about navigating the red tape of procurement.

We are authorized to sell you cost effective solutions, in addition to installing, maintaining and providing training for the top AV solutions and manufacturers on the market.

TSAV is happy to facilitate all of your AV needs. Please explore our website to learn more about how we can best accommodate you.

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TSAV maintains AVSP Diamond Level

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Mar 23, 2012 by Pete Dugas TSAV again receives the AV industry's highest certification with another year as AVSP Diamond Level. Congratulations to all of the staff members that have achieved CTS, CTS-I, and CTS-D certifications and who continue to contribute to pushing forward our standards of excellence! The Certified Technology...

Mar 23, 2012 by Pete Dugas

TSAV again receives the AV industry's highest certification with another year as
AVSP Diamond Level. Congratulations to all of the staff members that have achieved CTS,
CTS-I, and CTS-D certifications and who continue to contribute to pushing forward our
standards of excellence!

The Certified Technology Specialist (CTS®) for general expertise in AV, the CTS-D for
specialization in AV design and the CTS-I for specialization in AV installation, set the
standard for AV professional credentials. The CTS, CTS-D and CTS-I credentials are
accredited (#0770) by the International Organization for Standardization's (ISO) United
States representative, the American National Standards Institute (ANSI).

Companies that have achieved AVSP status have demonstrated their commitment to
professional excellence by supporting employees who achieve and maintain these
individual InfoComm International certification credentials and support of continuing
education. The company-level AVSP is based on the percentage of personnel (technical,
sales or customer service) who have achieved these certifications, and successful
completion of InfoComm Academy courses.

Established over 30 years ago, InfoComm's certification at all levels demonstrates
audiovisual knowledge and/or skills. Certified individuals adhere to the CTS Code of
Ethics and conduct and maintain their status through continued education. Today, there
are more than 9,000 audiovisual professionals who have earned the CTS credential.

TSAV, a Diamond AVSP holder for 3 years, is proud to be among an elite group of
professional companies. We stand behind our company's services, quality solutions,
and customer orientation, and have pledged to uphold a strict code of ethics and
workmanship practices which we integrate into our daily routine.

For more information on the AVSP program, please visit http://www.infocomm.org/avsp

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TSAV provides support for Athens-Clarke Heritage Foundation's Southern Mills Symposium

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Feb 28, 2012 by Rachel Sleppy TSAV was honored to assist the Athens-Clarke Heritage Foundation by providing audio support services for the Southern Mills Symposium held on February 4th at Chase Street Elementary School. The event was a valuable contribution to the awareness and education of Athenians who are interested in the course of...

Feb 28, 2012 by Rachel Sleppy

TSAV was honored to assist the Athens-Clarke Heritage Foundation by providing audio support services for the Southern Mills Symposium held on February 4th at Chase Street Elementary School. The event was a valuable contribution to the awareness and education of Athenians who are interested in the course of our town's future development, historic preservation, neighborhood issues, and preservation financing.

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Deployment completed at Harbor Schools in Thuwal, Saudi Arabia

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Feb 22, 2012 by Pete Dugas TSAV is pleased to have completed systems deployment at the Harbor Schools in Thuwal, Saudi Arabia. Systems integration involved 21st century classroom technologies for 80+ classrooms and lab spaces, auditoriums performance and presentation systems, athletics areas systems, distance learning and HD video...

Feb 22, 2012 by Pete Dugas

TSAV is pleased to have completed systems deployment at the Harbor Schools in Thuwal, Saudi Arabia. Systems integration involved 21st century classroom technologies for 80+ classrooms and lab spaces, auditoriums performance and presentation systems, athletics areas systems, distance learning and HD video teleconferencing systems. TSAV, in partnership with Casscade Media Systems, successfully deployed a digital learning platform customized to meet the needs of the school system's intensive IB standards curriculum. Through integration of user authentication with course delivery, capture, assessment, and longitudinal data, the Campus Plus Media Portal allows for correlation of objectives, content, utilization, and analytics. We are excited to be a part of such an advanced approach to educating future generations of students from the Middle East and around the world.

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Community Celebrates Career Academy's Dedication

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Dec 8, 2011 by Erin France Alumni of Athens High and Industrial School gathered Wednesday to celebrate their old school's reincarnation during the dedication of the Athens Community Career Academy and H.T. Edwards Complex. The H.T. Edwards Complex was once Athens' black high school — Athens High and Industrial School — which later...

Dec 8, 2011 by Erin France

Alumni of Athens High and Industrial School gathered Wednesday to celebrate their old school's reincarnation during the dedication of the Athens Community Career Academy and H.T. Edwards Complex.

The H.T. Edwards Complex was once Athens' black high school — Athens High and Industrial School — which later became Burney-Harris High School.

Named after Athens High's longtime and well-known principal, Homer T. Edwards, the Clarke County School District complex's campus gives high school students the chance to prepare for careers, allows young students to participate in after-school activities at the Boys & Girls Club and includes space for the school district's Office of Early Learning.

Georgia Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle was joined by county leaders, school officials, Edwards family members and more than 100 community members for the dedication.

Athens-Clarke Commissioner George Maxwell was part of Athens High and Industrial School's graduating class of 1957.

The school building itself wasn't great, Maxwell said.

"It was kind of an inferior school that they threw together for us — but look at what we have now," he said.

The Career Academy opened in August with 250 students enrolled in classes to help them prepare for — or try out — careers including health science, criminal justice and architectural drawing.

The main reason students drop out of school is because they don't see their classes as relevant, Cagle said. The career academy will give students a chance to see why an education is important, he added.

"This is not just simply a local school. This is not just about vocation. This is about exploring a new horizon," Cagle said.

The academy and the rest of the complex are the result of a partnership involving the Clarke County School District, Athens Technical College, the University of Georiga, the OneAthens anti-poverty initiative and local businesses.

Residents also supported the project by approving local sales tax referendums, said Athens-Clarke Mayor Nancy Denson, former Clarke County tax commissioner. "As a long-time tax collector, I can't think of any better use for our tax dollars than what we're seeing today," Denson said.

The H.T. Edwards Complex also received plenty of support from an outspoken Athens community that didn't want to see another historic black school torn down, said Commissioner Harry Sims, a 1967 alumnus of Athens High.

Having the complex named after her grandfather, who led Athens High from 1945 until his retirement in 1969, is a big honor, said Hannah Edwards, one of Homer Edwards' granddaughters.

Her grandfather loved to learn and loved to teach, she said, noting that her grandfather started teaching at age 17 and continued stressing education for himself, his family and his students, she said.

It's almost as if her grandfather walked through the complex that bears his name and chose the best teaching tools to fill his former school, she said.

"This building, this room, fills me with pride," she said. "I am humbled; I am truly humbled."

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Macon State College Unveils Education Building

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Nov 2, 2011 by ANDREA CASTILLO - acastillo@macon.com Macon State College students now have a new space to learn how to teach others.Tuesday evening, the college cut the ribbon on its $24.4 million education building, which houses Macon State's education programs and the Georgia Educator Support Alliance. The building has been in use...

Nov 2, 2011 by ANDREA CASTILLO - acastillo@macon.com

Macon State College students now have a new space to learn how to teach others.Tuesday evening, the college cut the ribbon on its $24.4 million education building, which houses Macon State's education programs and the Georgia Educator Support Alliance. The building has been in use since the beginning of the semester. Hank Huckaby, chancellor for the University System of Georgia, visited Macon State during the day, touring the campus and meeting with faculty and students. Huckaby also has visited other Middle Georgia colleges in the past week, including Georgia College & State University and Fort Valley State University, as part of a tour of all of the system's schools. He will visit Middle Georgia College on Nov. 11 and called his campus visits the best part of his job so far.
"You get a real feel for what's going on in the system," Huckaby said. "We have a lot to be proud of."The three-story, 80,000-square-foot education building at Macon State includes open classrooms that resemble those in actual schools, a tiered lecture hall, wireless access, conference rooms and faculty offices.Atlanta-based company tvsdesign designed the education building, and Chris R. Sheridan & Co. in Macon built it. "It provides the programs in teaching students in the region a major resource," Macon State College President Jeff Allbritten said. "It's very, very exciting."Pamela Bedwell, dean of the college's School of Education, called the completion of the building a "milestone" for the education programs, providing better resources to future teachers.Macon State's School of Education has gained a solid reputation in the state since it was founded, and having the facility will continue its quest for excellence in teacher preparation, said Bedwell, who oversees 600 students who have declared education majors or have been formally accepted into one of the programs."What the facility does is allows us to teach the way people learn," she said.Guests at Tuesday's ribbon-cutting ceremony also had the chance to tour the facility. A group of early childhood education students gave a demonstration of interactive lessons about the Lewis and Clark expedition through the Louisiana Territory from 1804 to 1806, which included a dance around a tepee in the classroom, as well as opportunities for the students to make their own tepees or beaded bracelets.Hannah Watson, a senior from Juliette, played Sacagawea, a Shoshone Indian woman who accompanied the pair on their quest, and said the new facility gives her an idea of what to expect when she becomes a teacher."It models classes where you're going to teach in and how to use the technology," Watson said. Brittany Sledge, a senior from Lizella, played William Clark of the Lewis and Clark duo, and said the environment is more conducive to reaching out to students. "We teach our students to learn in a group setting and learn from each other," she said.

To contact writer Andrea Castillo, 744-4331.

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A Supreme Dedication At The New Augusta Judicial Center

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by George Eskola Augusta, GA — U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Clarence Thomas did not know Judge John H. Ruffin, Jr. But… he knows where he came from. "As a lawyer and as a judge, he fought for integration and civil rights, and throughout his career he was a trailblazer," said the Associate Justice of the United...

by George Eskola

Augusta, GA — U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Clarence Thomas did not know Judge John H. Ruffin, Jr. But… he knows where he came from. "As a lawyer and as a judge, he fought for integration and civil rights, and throughout his career he was a trailblazer," said the Associate Justice of the United State Supreme Court.

Hundreds gathered to dedicate Augusta's new courthouse, named in honor of Augusta's trailblazer Judge John H. Ruffin, Jr.

"You can say not only did he pave the way but he helped cut the bushes that laid the pavement so I could walk in that way," said State Court Judge David Watkins.

But, there was controversy in the way the dedication was put together. Some members of the minority community were not happy about not being involved in the decision to invite Justice Thomas, a jurist known for his conservative views. However, Ruffin's widow was not bothered by having Thomas as the dedication speaker.

"I have no personal trouble, I respect different issues and points of view we should listen to all points of view," said Judith Ruffin.

Thomas may have faced doubters in the crowd, but won many over with his speech and actions afterwards, spending more than an hour after the dedication greeting and talking with members of the audience.

"He understood the controversy. I told him I appreciated him coming amidst the controversy and still standing up to the plate and giving a great speech and honoring Judge Ruffin at the same time," said Augusta Commissioner Alvin Mason.

"Outstanding, I think Augusta is better off and we're better off for this occasion," said Revered Nathaniel Irvin, of Old Storm Branch Baptist Church in Clearwater, SC.

Judge Carlisle Overstreet invited Justice Thomas to speak at this dedication. He says Judge Ruffin would have liked the result. "God bless his soul, he would have been happy, he would not have wanted any controversy, and I think Judge Thomas's speech indicates there should not be any," said Judge Overstreet.

"Anybody can stir that up we should focus on the people who build not the people tear down," said Justice Thomas, after the dedication.

I asked if he was surprised by the reception and whether it was a nice one from Augusta.

"Life is a nice reception I've had nothing but good there's always some fly in the ointment if you spend time worrying about the fly in the ointment you will never get anything done," he said.

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Digital Projection International 3D Mapping Demonstration

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Mar 23, 2011 by Mary Pierce Bullock 3D projection mapping, according to Wikipedia, "is any method of mapping three-dimensional points to a two-dimensional plane." Using this technique, video artists are able to align projected video to buildings that they are projecting on and create amazing 3D effects, making it look as though the...

Mar 23, 2011 by Mary Pierce Bullock

3D projection mapping, according to Wikipedia, "is any method of mapping three-dimensional points to a two-dimensional plane." Using this technique, video artists are able to align projected video to buildings that they are projecting on and create amazing 3D effects, making it look as though the buildings are morphing, crumbling, burning and more.

Integrated Visions Productions, New Media Services and TSAV teamed up with Digital Projection International, a digital imaging pioneer and industry leader in ultra high performance projection systems. DPI provided one of their LIGHTNING 45-1080p 30,000 lumen projectors and all of the content was custom made by Integrated Visions Productions.

The following is an example of the phenomenal things that can be done when animators, video designers and sound engineers utilize the power of 3D projection mapping. This documentation footage is straight out of the camera with no post production or color correction. Make sure you have your volume turned up.


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Bulldogs aiming to be the best with Butts-Mehre renovation, addition

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Feb 9, 2011 by Lee Shearer, Athens Banner Herald University of Georgia coaches, athletic administrators and football players already are moving into offices and training rooms inside a huge addition to the UGA Athletic Association's Butts-Mehre Heritage Hall.300_advertisement_header.gif The public will have to wait a little longer to...

Feb 9, 2011 by Lee Shearer, Athens Banner Herald

University of Georgia coaches, athletic administrators and football players already are moving into offices and training rooms inside a huge addition to the UGA Athletic Association's Butts-Mehre Heritage Hall.
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The public will have to wait a little longer to get a look inside the $40 million office and museum that athletic officials say will be the best football training facility in the country – as well as a recruiting tool to draw top football talent to Georgia.

The building will be dedicated in an official ceremony in February, and even then, many of the building's most unusual features will remain hidden, architects said during a tour of the building Monday.

Architecturally, the 53,000-square-foot project was harder than just putting up a new building, said Campus Architect Danny Sniff.

Designers had make the addition's look blend in with the existing building and nearby structures, while at the same time adding all the features coaches and athletic association officials wanted, he said.

"It took a long time to make it simple," said Gwynne Darden, a university architect who worked with UGA athletic association officials on the project.

When visitors get a chance to go inside the sports museum, they'll be able to peer through a large glass window into a video editing room, where workers prepare digital movies of previous games for coaches or players.

They may not notice, though, that the floor in that room is raised so that all the cabling connecting the state-of-the-art audiovisual system will fit, Darden said. Workers inside also can flip a switch to make windows opaque, effectively shutting out prying eyes.

The addition's most visible part is behind a huge glass wall that faces Stegeman Coliseum, where the UGA basketball and gymnastics teams compete – a room about 20 yards long and as wide as a football field, with a ceiling more than 30 feet high.

The UGA football team will be able to run plays in the cavernous room. The room's floor is covered in artificial grass and is marked like a football field, but the space also can double as a dining area big enough to seat 500.

UGA football coach Mark Richt gets the best views in the building from an office suite as large as a small house.

One room in the suite overlooks the mini field where his football team can run plays.

Windows in another room of the coach's suite overlook an outdoor practice field and another hidden feature of the building – a buried cistern that can hold 135,000 gallons of rain water to irrigate the field during dry times.

Workers with Brasfield & Gorrie, the general contractor, have added 53,000 square feet of new space to Butts-Mehre and are renovating 23,000 square feet of the old building, Darden said.

The futuristic, domed Butts-Mehre cube contains about 80,000 square feet and opened in 1987.

Players already are using a huge new weight room and a training facility that former athletic director Damon Evans promised would be the best in the country when contractors began work about 16 months ago.

One room called a hydro spa contains four water pools for rehabilitative therapy, including one with a large treadmill that can be raised from the bottom of the pool to the top.

The addition also includes dozens of meeting rooms – small spaces just for running backs or defensive linemen, for example, as well as larger rooms where the entire defensive or offensive team might gather.

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KAUST Earns AIA 'Top Ten Green Projects' Award

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Feb 2, 2011 by www.hok.com HOK earned its eighth recognition on the prestigious Top Ten Green Projects List with the 2010 selection of King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) to the prestigious list. Commissioned by the American Institute of Architects Committee on the Environment, the annual awards program honors...

Feb 2, 2011 by www.hok.com

HOK earned its eighth recognition on the prestigious Top Ten Green Projects List with the 2010 selection of King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) to the prestigious list. Commissioned by the American Institute of Architects Committee on the Environment, the annual awards program honors sustainable projects resulting from an integrated approach to architecture, natural systems and technology.

As Saudi Arabia's first LEED certified project and the world's largestLEED-NC Platinum project, KAUST is a new international, graduate-level research university established to drive innovation in science and technology and to support world-class research in areas such as energy and the environment.

HOK designed the 6.5-million-square-foot campus on a highly visible 9,000-acre site along the Red Sea, 50 miles north of Jeddah.

Multiple HOK design teams worldwide worked in tandem to integrate sustainability into the design and construction of the world-class, 26-building campus. Several hundred HOK people in 11 different offices on three continents contributed to the ambitious project, which was delivered within an unprecedented schedule from conception to completion in just three years.

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IPTV: Outshining Cable in the Classroom and Beyond

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Jan 1, 2011 by Pete Dugas Let's face it, cable television (CATV) in the classroom, training room, and other institutional gathering spaces has become a requirement. Utilized for education, entertainment, and timely dissemination of information, we've become dependent on CATV to view news broadcasts during times of emergency or live...

Jan 1, 2011 by Pete Dugas

Let's face it, cable television (CATV) in the classroom, training room, and other institutional gathering spaces has become a requirement. Utilized for education, entertainment, and timely dissemination of information, we've become dependent on CATV to view news broadcasts during times of emergency or live events such as weather alerts or presidential announcements which may affect us or our organizations. The desire for on-demand access to this live broadcast content is now inherent regardless of the overwhelming marketing highlighting mobile television capabilities in newer cell phones and the latest devices from Apple and Google. This desire for more personalized control of content (in-hand) is as much a result of the effectiveness of broadcast media and its availability in our institutions and our homes as it is a cause. The requirement of availability of broadcast content in institutional meeting spaces is constant.

TV in the classroom is outdated and expensive.

Current standards for providing CATV in gathering spaces including classrooms and training rooms involves the utilization of standard radio frequency (RF)-based distribution, a soon-to-be outdated vehicle for communication technology. Even in 2010, specifications for new buildings and renovation projects mandate that RF-based distribution be used for a portion of the building's electrical scope even though costs associated with deployment of these specification sections range from $40k to $80k. These costs can increase to well over $100k should the scope include CATV tuners or televisions for classrooms.

The basic technology utilized for cable in the classroom leverages a primary CATV connection that is generally provided by a local cable company. This connection is manipulated to network rooms within the school building together. This is similar to an expanded version your home cable television setup, but a lot more expensive. This kind of deployment only gets more expensive with the more buildings a school system sets up.

It is also important to note that RF-based CATV distribution systems provide for limited functionality. it is difficult and costly to locate qualified service technicians willing to support these networks in commercial or institutional applications.

Here is a line item example of the long-term cost implications of traditional CATV deployment in a given school district.

District A – (K-12), US-Based

Existing Legacy Buildings where CATV Systems exist: 35
Average cost to implement (Head-end plus, TVs, Mounts, VCRs, etc): $75,000
Average age of systems: 10 yrs
Average annual maintenance costs: $200
Total cost of existing systems to date: $2,695,000
Planned new schools or renovations: 6
Average cost to implement (Head-end plus tuners only): $55,000
Total new deployment costs: $330,000
Grand Total: $3,025,000
* these cost examples are derived from a school district in the State of Georgia, USA.

The cost-effective, tech savvy solution: Internet Protocol Television (IPTV) via Casscade Media Systems' Media Portal, Light Edition (CMP LE)

As an alternative to distributing CATV or other broadcast sources via traditional RF-based systems, CMP LE provides for expanded functionality at a fraction of what traditional systems cost. By utilizing, in most cases, existing network infrastructure, broadcast TV may be distributed from an institution's central network-based head-end to every desktop in the district.

Through centralizing the institution's broadcast TV head-end, costs that were typically shouldered at each building are only required to be paid for once. As soon as the head-end is set up, the system may be infinitely expanded without having to repurchase new head-end systems. The larger the network, the larger the savings.

System requirements of the CMP LE are standard for typical institutions. In most cases, these features are required for implementation of other technologies required within a given institution. In turn, related overhead and maintenance costs are at most negligible.

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Protecting Your Intellectual Property

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Nov 1, 2010 by Tom Zind, ProAV Magazine As AV integrators develop more proprietary solutions, efforts to protect IP like software source code are getting more attention. When integrator Technical Services Audio Visual recently landed a contract to design a system for a university client's campus building, a roadblock stopped project...

Nov 1, 2010 by Tom Zind, ProAV Magazine

As AV integrators develop more proprietary solutions, efforts to protect IP like software source code are getting more attention.

When integrator Technical Services Audio Visual recently landed a contract to design a system for a university client's campus building, a roadblock stopped project planning in its tracks. The "keys" to the software another AV systems integrator had used to build an earlier system that the client wanted to essentially duplicate in a new venue weren't accessible.

"The contractor who preceded us never provided the client with the software source code," says Pete Dugas, president of the Athens, GA, company. "We explained that they either had to get the source code or pay us to build the system again from the ground up."

To the budget-minded client's relief, Dugas' company examined the contract for the prior job and found that the source code used to the design the control system was, in fact, the university's property. "The other integrator hadn't supplied the source code, but the contract documents that were drawn up by the designer the university hired for the original install stated the integrator was to supply the source code to the university. So we had to coach the client on how to get it from the integrator."

The client, Dugas says, wasn't the only one surprised. The integrator, too, wasn't aware it was contractually obliged to provide the code, he says.

Ownership questions
Similar misunderstandings, which can bear the seeds of potentially contentious disputes, are becoming more commonplace in the pro AV industry. As AV systems designers, consultants, and integrators use proprietary software programs to build increasingly complex and unique solutions, questions about who owns them and who gets to use them linger.

Indeed, the AV industry is waking up to the broad issue of intellectual property (IP) – the tangible and occasionally intangible products of designers of all stripes at AV systems solutions providers. Potentially encompassing everything from software to shop drawings to project design specifications, intellectual property is emerging as the essence of the "product" that industry players are selling. As such, it's increasingly being recognized as something worthy of protection, or at least appreciated for its value and wisely managed.

The industry's two major trade associations are devoting more resources to shedding light on the matter. Both the National Systems Contractors Association and InfoComm International staged educational sessions on IP at recent trade shows. The latter organized two roundtable meetings on the topic in New York and Chicago built around a new attorney-prepared "white paper" outlining the various types of IP and how they can be protected.

The importance of identifying and protecting IP is a message that's starting to resonate with more integrators like Technology Providers Inc., Chandler, AZ. IP in all its forms, especially custom software critical to implementing custom solutions, is the essence of a modern integrator's business, says company president Ralph Cruz.

"Ultimately, what's going to set integrators apart or make them unique is the ability to produce IP," he says. "When you have 10 integrators all after the same jobs with the same access to component vendors, what's unique is the service and the IP – the minds and people who embody those minds – that can be provided. We value it significantly."

But of all the IP possessed by systems integrators, software that allows multiple systems components to work in tandem and yields the critical control interface is the IP asset garnering the most attention — and for good reason. Merely the most visible part of an AV solution, much AV hardware, notes Bill Nattress, a programming specialist and senior associate in the Chicago office of systems designer Shen Milsom & Wilke, is a "boat anchor until software is brought to bear."

Many integrators, however, remain focused on the profit margins derived from selling the hard assets and labor needed to deliver functional AV systems. Even as more integrators find themselves spending more time and money to develop software essential to the solutions they deliver, methods for properly valuing, managing, and protecting the IP that's created are elusive. Moreover, there's not even full agreement among integrators about whether it makes good business sense to try to protect software IP.

Source code key
At issue in the software IP debate is access to source code, the essential building block of all software programs. In applications, source code yields compiled machine code, which can't be readily interpreted or modified.

With the source code at hand, however, software programs can be modified, enhanced, and even duplicated. Thus, companies that invest significant amounts of time developing software and place a value on it often are highly protective of source code.

The software IP debate in the pro AV industry centers on who ultimately owns source code and whether and under what circumstances clients should be able to access it and use it as a building block for future system enhancements and add-ons. To a lesser degree, the issue of ownership and use by employees, contract programmers, and other integrators is part of the debate.

As the source code ownership issue comes to the fore, integrators are adopting different strategies. While some companies say code ownership is far down their list of concerns, others are adopting a range of solutions to protect their interests, from detailed licensing arrangements to selling the source code outright to establishing software "escrow" arrangements.

Whatever the approach, integrators and others who seek to protect source code have a strong legal leg on which to stand. Attorneys specializing in IP protection, like Dean Pelletier, who presented at one of InfoComm's recent IP roundtables, say authors of original software and the underlying source code have well-established copyright protection. The key for integrators, though, is establishing that fact up front by addressing ownership, usage, and transference issues during contract negotiations.

"The fundamental issue is appreciating what it is you have in the form of IP and taking steps to establish ownership rights or perfecting those rights, and identifying and accounting for any intellectual property in any contracts you enter into with contributors or clients," says Pelletier, of McAndrews Held & Malloy, Chicago.

One of the keys to integrators retaining ownership rights, Pelletier says, is to ensure that common "work-for-hire" arrangements that imply any, and all work done for a client is the client's property are strictly avoided.

Unless, that is, you're an integrator who's hired a consultant or contract programmer to program a system for one of your projects. In that case, to protect your interests, you want to invoke the "work for hire" framework that transfers ownership of any work done for you to you. That way, the source code they develop on a project basis becomes your property, says Randy Notzen, an IP attorney and vice president of Webb Law Firm, Pittsburgh.

"When working with consultants or outside programmers it's important that you have an expressed assignment of copyright to you in your agreement with them," says Notzen, who's served on IP panels at AV industry trade shows. "Avoid ad hoc, word-of-mouth agreements on this issue, because if this issue is overlooked and not addressed up front they'll be in a position later to come back and want royalties for the source code they wrote. That can be cured by dotting your 'Is' and crossing your 'Ts' at contract time. You need language in there that assigns the code to you."

Up until several years ago, HB Communications, Inc., a North Haven, CT, integrator didn't spend much time worrying about source code issues. But as software applications grew and it learned how valuable and vulnerable its source code was to being recycled, the company began taking steps to protect it, says Jim Smith, the company's director of strategic initiatives.

Smith said he began to appreciate what was at stake when HB was tapped by a former client to finish up work on a project another integrator it hired couldn't complete. "They asked us to come in and help program the system, and when I opened it up my name was on the source code that I developed for a previous job we did for them," Smith says.

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The Big Picture

buckhead-theater

Aug 12, 2010 by Don Kreski, Systems Contractor News A Former Movie Palace Turns Into A 21st Century Multi-Purpose Venue ATLANTA, GA—The Buckhead Theatre originally opened in 1931 as a movie palace and was used in that capacity for over 50 years. In the mid 1980s it was renamed the Roxy and became a concert venue but...

Aug 12, 2010 by Don Kreski, Systems Contractor News

A Former Movie Palace Turns Into A 21st Century Multi-Purpose Venue

ATLANTA, GA—The Buckhead Theatre originally opened in 1931 as a movie palace and was used in that capacity for over 50 years. In the mid 1980s it was renamed the Roxy and became a concert venue but fell into disrepair. Owner Charles Loudermilk purchased the building in early 2008 and closed it for a two-year renovation.

Loudermilk brought in Novare Events of Atlanta, who in turn was able to bring the legendary music promoter Alex Cooley out of retirement to help manage the venue, so they are ready to book an impressive roster of performers and corporate clients. Technology consulting and integration were provided by TSAV of Atlanta, GA, which designed the video, audio control, and video distribution systems.

Loudermilk decided to pull out all the fixed seating in the main auditorium and leveled the sloped floor to accommodate 28 dining tables for up to 224 people. They can also set up theater-style seating for audiences up to 850 or accommodate up to 2,100 standing. The newly restored Buckhead Theatre is a flexible venue ideal for concerts, corporate events, fund raising dinners, off-Broadway shows, product presentations, seminars— even weddings and bar mitzvahs.

"This is a super flexible space," said Keith Reardigan, the project engineer for TSAV. "It was very hard for the client to know exactly what kinds of programs they will bring into the facility, but, due to our experience in similar renovations, we knew there would be a need for movies, corporate presentations, theater, and live sound."

To control these systems, Reardigan used a Crestron AV2 processor installed in the theater's main rack, with a production-level interface using XPanel running on an HP workstation. He also included more limited and automated controls accessed from C2N-FT-TPS4 touchpanels built into lecterns that can be set up in the theater and each of the meeting spaces in the building's converted second floor area. "If there's a production manager in charge of a concert or stage show, we can give him full control over the installed projection, sound, and video distribution systems from XPanel. But for a meeting or corporate presentation, with a little setup the presenter can have the basic controls he needs on the touch panel."

The ground floor theater includes a 16- by 23-foot rear screen served by two Digital Projection Titan SX+500 projectors with wide-angle lenses, projecting side-by-side and edgeblended using a Vista Systems Spyder video processor. "We used two projectors mainly because of the real estate we had to work with and the brightness we needed," Reardigan explained. "It's a massive screen, and we just didn't have the throw distance for a single projector."

The sound system includes a 7.1 surround processor for feature films as well as a 48-channel Yamaha digital mixer for meetings, theater, and concerts, each feeding audio into a series of Crown amplifiers and JBL THX-certified loudspeakers. For the concert and main PA rig, TSAV used a Nexo GEO S Series line array system powered by NXAMP 4×4s supplemented with the JBL THXcertified surround for 5.1 movie viewing purposes. Reardigan also designed the video distribution system to transmit video and sound from any of the sources in the theater to the six flat panels in the lobby and bar, two 15- by 11-foot screens on the marquee outside, and on each projection screen in the four meeting rooms upstairs. For these systems, he used a mix of Crestron QuickMedia with Blonder Tounge RF distribution products.

"We used Crestron QuickMedia transmitters, switchers, and cable to move the signals around the facility for a number of reasons," Reardigan said. "First, we wanted an all-digital signal path, and QuickMedia provided an economical solution. We had a cable-length issue going from the equipment rack in the theater to the marquee, which QuickMedia solved. Finally, QuickMedia provided a nice solution for room combining in the meeting rooms upstairs." Reardigan used a QM-RMCRX-BA room controller in each room and a QMMD8X8 switcher to provide input at the presentation positions.

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Crestron Control and QuickMedia® Help Turn Former Southern Movie Palace Into a 21st Century Multi-Purpose Venue

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Aug 2, 2010 by Crestron Staff "There are very few venues in the country that have the type of AV system we have. There's a high definition projector with a 23-foot rear screen. We have THX sound, a Yamaha soundboard, Crestron control and video distribution. The video distribution system can show whatever is going on in any part of the...

Aug 2, 2010 by Crestron Staff

"There are very few venues in the country that have the type of AV system we have. There's a high definition projector with a 23-foot rear screen. We have THX sound, a Yamaha soundboard, Crestron control and video distribution. The video distribution system can show whatever is going on in any part of the facility on projectors and flat screens throughout, including a dual-screen video marquee at the front of the theater."

That's how Chip Pottinger, Construction and Redevelopment Manager for the restored Buckhead Theatre in Atlanta, describes its new video and sound systems. This extremely flexible venue, according to Pottinger, is ideal for concerts,corporate events, fund raising dinners, off-Broadway shows, product presentations, seminars – even weddings and bar mitzvahs.

Owner Charles Loudermilk brought in Novare Events of Atlanta, who in turn was able to bring the legendary Atlanta musical promoter Alex Cooley out of retirement to help manage the venue, so they are ready to book an impressive roster of performers and corporate clients. Technology consulting and integration were provided by TSAV of Atlanta, who designed the control and video distribution systems using Crestron multimedia products.

The Renovation

The Buckhead Theatre originally opened in 1931 as a movie palace and was used in that capacity for over 50 years. In the mid '80s it was renamed the Roxy and became a concert venue but fell into disrepair. Loudermilk purchased the building in early 2008 and closed it for renovation, a two-year process that has completely restored and rebuilt the facility. "Mr. Loudermilk and I both went to movies here as kids, Charlie in the 30's and me in the 50's," Pottinger says. "It was our neighborhood theater."

The restoration was a labor of love, with Pottinger falling back
on his background as a general contractor. A collaborative effort brought in master craftsmen to repair and recreate hundreds of linear feet of millwork and plaster moldings, as well as plaster arches, ceiling medallions, stonework and other details. Loudermilk decided to pull out all the fixed seating in the main auditorium and leveled the sloped floor to accommodate 28 dining tables for up to 224 people. They can also set up theater-style seating for audiences up to 850 or accommodate up to 2100 standing for concerts or dances. The renovation also included the conversion of second floor office space into a 5500-square foot divisible ballroom that can used as one room or separated into two, three or four meeting spaces. In addition, there is a new catering kitchen, new restrooms, dressing rooms, and a greenroom for performers.

The AV systems are first-rate. "This is a super flexible space," says Keith Reardigan, the project engineer for TSAV. "It was very hard for the client to know exactly what kinds of programs they will bring into the facility, but, due to our experience in similar renovations, we knew there would be a need for movies, corporate presentations, theater and live sound."

To control these systems, Reardigan used a Crestron AV2 processor installed in the theater's main rack, with a production-level interface using XPanel running on an HP workstation. He also included more limited and automated controls accessed from Crestron C2N-FT-TPS4 3.6" FlipTop touchpanels built into lecterns that can be set up in the theater and each of the meeting spaces.

"If there's a production manager in charge of a concert or stage show, we can give him full control over the installed projection, sound and video distribution systems from XPanel. But for a meeting or corporate presentation, with a little setup the presenter can have the basic controls he needs on the touchpanel."

" The restoration is superb. We've got cutting edge technology in a very intimate venue. Everyone has been very impressed with its sound and video quality"
Chip Pottinger, Buckhead Theatre

Systems Design At a Glance

The spaces within the Buckhead Theatre and their AV systems can be used separately or combined for a large event. The ground floor theater includes a 16 × 23′ rear screen served by two Digital Projection Titan SX+500 projectors with wide-angle lenses, projecting side by side and edge-blended using a video processor. "We used two projectors mainly because of the real estate we had to work with and the brightness we needed," Reardigan explains. "It's a massive screen, and we just didn't have the throw distance for a single projector."

The sound system includes a 7.1 surround processor for feature films as well as a 48-channel Yamaha digital mixer for meetings, theater and concerts, each feeding audio into a series of Crown amplifiers and JBL THX-certified loudspeakers. For the concert and main PA rig, TSAV used a Nexo GEOS line array system powered by 4×4 power amplifiers supplemented with the JBL THXcertified surround for 5.1 movie viewing purposes.

Reardigan also designed the video distribution system to transmit video and sound from any of the sources in the theater to the six flat panels in the lobby and bar, to two 15' H x 11' W screens on the marquee outside, and on each projection screen in the four meeting rooms upstairs. For these systems, he used a mix of QuickMedia with Blonder Tounge RF distribution products. "We used Crestron QuickMedia transmitters, switchers and cable to move the signals around the facility for a number of reasons," Reardigan says. "First, we wanted an all-digital signal path, and QuickMedia provided an economical solution. We had a cable-length issue going from the equipment rack in the theater to the marquee, which QuickMedia solved." Crestron QM-RMCRX-BA room controllers were installed in each room along with a QM-MD8X8 switcher to provide input at the presentation positions. "QuickMedia also provided a nice solution for room combining in the meeting rooms upstairs," Reardigan added.

These meeting rooms are an important part of the mission of the theater. Combined, they offer seating for up to 250 guests, and they can be used either as overflow space for the theater or independently for luncheons, dinners or conferences. "They really lend themselves to more intimate events at the Buckhead Theatre," he explains. The meeting center offers large-screen display via Sanyo WXGA projectors, wireless microphones, installed house sound and podiums equipped with Shure gooseneck microphones and Crestron 3.6" FlipTop touchpanels.

"The finished venue is a jewel box," Pottinger says. "The restoration is superb. We've got cutting-edge technology in a very intimate venue. Everyone has been very impressed with its sound and video quality, its versatility and its ability to accommodate any group from 12 for lunch to 2100 for a concert."

http://tsav.com/system/news_attachments/attachments/7/original/Buckhead_Theatre_Crestron_Website_August_2010.pdf?1281364669

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Get the Job, Part II

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May 17, 2010 by Don Kreski, Sound and Video Contractor Last month, we looked at the science of responding to requests for proposal (RFPs): the processes you must go through to ensure that your proposals realistically describe what you plan to do, set a profitable price on your work, and protect you from unexpected demands and...

May 17, 2010 by Don Kreski, Sound and Video Contractor

Last month, we looked at the science of responding to requests for proposal (RFPs): the processes you must go through to ensure that your proposals realistically describe what you plan to do, set a profitable price on your work, and protect you from unexpected demands and issues.

This month, I'd like to ask the question: Can the way you write up a bid document help you win the bid?

In a perfect world, that would probably not be the case. But since this is the real world, you have to realize that a significant portion of RFPs are sent when the client or consultant is not sure who the most qualified bidder may be and has trouble evaluating the bidders' qualifications. So if you want the best chance of winning, you need to make several points in your proposal that go over and above your description of how you intend to complete the project and at what price.

"It is a selling document," says K.C. Schwarz, founder and CEO of the Northglenn, Colo.-based buying and integration consortium USAV Group. "You have to present the core information about your company that explains who you are and why that's important."

The two-envelope process
Consultant Jeff Loether, president of Gaithersburg, Md.-based consulting firm Electro-Media Design, explains that some consultants use a two-envelope process to help determine who is the most qualified bidder and quantify how much those extra qualifications may be worth.

"In the first envelope go your responses to a series of questions we ask: 'Please tell us about your experience doing projects like this,' 'Please give us a list of similar projects,' and so on," he says. "Then we review those responses and give each answer so many points.

"In the second envelope is your price. When we get all the bids, we open each envelope one and rank their scores from the highest to lowest. Theoretically, if envelope two from the most qualified bidder is within budget, we should award the bid to that contractor without opening the others."

In practice, Loether says, the consultant and the owner do open all the envelopes, and they discuss the trade-offs. If the second-most-qualified bidder has a significantly lower price, he or she may get the contract. Or the low bidder may win if they think he's qualified enough to complete the job successfully. "But the idea of this process is that we would not accept low bids from unqualified contractors," Loether says.

If a given RFP asks these types of qualifying questions, then your first priority is simply to answer them. If not, you need to make sure your proposal answers them anyway, even if your company is well-known to the consultant and the client. "After all," Schwarz says, "the document is going to be read by many people, and some of them will have no idea who you are."

What you need to convey
Loether says his primary concern in sending out an RFP is to help his clients get the most for their money. "From my view, value is a balance of six attributes: flexibility, ease of use, performance, first cost, operating cost, and reliability," he says.

To judge who is likely to provide the best value, he says determining the contractor's qualifications is the first priority, followed by responsiveness—that is, whether he or she follows the directions carefully; meets the specifications; or suggests, in a helpful way, how he might do something better. "A contractor who can't or won't follow the instructions in the RFP is probably not going to follow the specifications on the job site very well either," Loether says.

How do you show that you're well-qualified?
Pete Dugas, CEO of Atlanta-based integration and consulting firm TSAV, explains, "I see more value in saying, 'We've done these similar jobs successfully,' than anything else. That's definitely a way of showing why we think we can handle this project.

"You should talk about who your people are, what their specific qualifications or certifications consist of, as part of a section about your company."

Try to quantify as much as you can, Dugas says. Can you put some kind of numbers to your track record, your levels of success, or customer satisfaction?

"You want to address your capacities within the period of time you'll be working on this project," he says. "Do you expect to have adequate time, adequate capacity, and why?

"Your company's values are also very important. If someone is going out and buying something that costs $100,000, they're going to consider a lot of facets, including the character and integrity of the people they're buying from."

For that reason, a client list and reference list may be helpful, but not necessarily your entire client list. Instead, include a list of relevant clients and specific references from people at organizations similar to the one you hope will hire you for this project.

Schwarz says he asks USAV members to build proposals around three key factors: "'Who we are,' 'How we do business,' and 'Here's this project and what specifically we will bring to bear,'" he says.

As part of that approach, he suggests highlighting the methods you will use to complete the project successfully. If you will define control milestones or product and program testing, say so in the document. "Do you have a healthy methodology for building AV systems?" Schwarz asks. If so, describing it in the bid document sets you apart from other integrators and helps make the case that you are worth hiring—even, in many cases, if your bid turns out to be higher than the rest.

Boilerplating
The sales section of the proposal is so important that both Schwarz and Dugas say every company should develop standard boilerplates for their proposals and make sure everyone uses them.

Of course, there are pitfalls to using this kind of template. "We want to see a proposal that's relevant to the project, " Loether says. "We understand that people use boilerplates, but they should be edited and made pertinent to the job."

In the end, directness will be appreciated. "We just try to tell people who we are and what we do," Dugas says. "There's no sleight of hand in a proposal. You have to be honest and transparent."

You may well ask, Why go through all this effort if the job will just go to the lowest bidder? "At least six out of 10 are based on price, but not all of them," Dugas says. "We have definitely been chosen when we were the high bidder. In fact, we're working on two relatively large projects like that right now."

The art and the science of proposal writing are important. Mastering them will pay off with more business and more profits.

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TSAV Introduces Skills Lab Solutions - Education Tools For The Future

MedLab

Apr 28, 2010 by TSAV Staff TSAV has been helping universities improve their learning environment via a turnkey classroom and lab capture systems. For classes requiring hands on, real world experience, TSAV has created an AV monitoring , capture and communication system that will allow for more affective means of evaluating student...

Apr 28, 2010 by TSAV Staff

TSAV has been helping universities improve their learning environment via a turnkey classroom and lab capture systems. For classes requiring hands on, real world experience, TSAV has created an AV monitoring , capture and communication system that will allow for more affective means of evaluating student performance. Our Video and Audio Capture Systems capture content from work and examination areas digitally encoding student work and instructor demonstrations. An observation system may be housed in a separate area or control room, providing for live monitoring or camera feeds and captured content. Other options are also available including an IP-based intercom system allowing for bidirectional communication between the control room and any single or all work areas required.

For the Medical College of Georgia, TSAV has implemented an impressive clinical skills content archival, streaming, and student assessment system, along side our partnership with B-Line Medical. The Clinical Skills Lab System installed at MCG is designed to give medical students real world experience without an instructor looking over their shoulder. Cameras and ceiling mounted microphones in the patient rooms allow instructors to view and asses student's abilities from a separate location via monitors. Since the procedure is recorded and archived, instructors have the ability to go back and review student's work and progress. For the medical student, TSAV's Clinical Skills Lab System is a vital tool that allows them to review procedure, instructional topics discussed in lab, or review their past performances. Before medical students enter an exam room or lab they will enter their name and information on a monitor outside the "patient area" door. This information will be recorded and sent to the observation rooms for the instructors to log. This information is stored along with the students documented performance and stored for instructors use at a later time. The positive effects of TSAV's Clinical Skills Lab System can already be seen at MCG. A number of other departments at MCG are looking into how a TSAVClinical Skills Lab System can help their departments create better students and medical professionals, while enhance their learning environment.

TSAV's Clinical Skills Lab System is helping to make better doctors and a better learning environment through real world experience.

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TSAV's installation at the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology is highlighted in AV Specialist Magazine

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Apr 21, 2010 by Kevan Jones Consistent Application TSAV (Technical Services Audio Visual) with headquarters in Georgia,USA have been appointed as an audiovisual consultant on KAUST's faculty and managing director Peter Dugas (CTS, AIA) is adamant that the consistent application of standards is a key component behind the success of the...

Apr 21, 2010 by Kevan Jones

Consistent Application

TSAV (Technical Services Audio Visual) with headquarters in Georgia,USA have been appointed as an audiovisual consultant on KAUST's faculty and managing director Peter Dugas (CTS, AIA) is adamant that the consistent application of standards is a key component behind the success of the project. "The KAUST campus or city is a huge project that expands along the Red Sea for dozens of kilometers," he says. "The project's audiovisual technology's complexity mirrors that of the overall construction project, spanning dozens of facilities and providing for presentation, conferencing, distance learning, skills labs and classroom capture, enterprise streaming, interactive displays, and even large format production systems. At the onset of the integration project there were nearly 35 thousand active construction workers living on site, dedicated concrete and desalination plants, and a vehicle traffic management system that provided challenges of its own. With a dozen or more integration firms involved in order to meet project schedules, standardization not only of equipment but of installation techniques is essential. Through this standardization and a rigorous focus on constant improvement to quality of workmanship we anticipate significant reduction in long term support and maintenance costs. And, perhaps more importantly, we are realizing high levels of student, faculty and staff utilization of these very useful technologies".

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Get the Job, Part I

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Apr 6, 2010 by Don Kreski, Sound and Video Contractor There's an art and a science to writing winning proposals. The science will help you make sure the document you submit will realistically describe what you plan to do, sets a profitable price on your work, and protects you from unreasonable or unanticipated demands and issues. The...

Apr 6, 2010 by Don Kreski, Sound and Video Contractor

There's an art and a science to writing winning proposals.

The science will help you make sure the document you submit will realistically describe what you plan to do, sets a profitable price on your work, and protects you from unreasonable or unanticipated demands and issues.

The art can help you to make the case that you are, in fact, the best contractor to do the job, worth hiring over others who bid the same price or a lower price to complete the work.

To help you optimize both sides of the equation, I recently spoke to three industry experts on the process of answering requests for proposal (RFPs): K.C. Schwarz, founder and CEO of the Northglenn, Colo.-based buying and integration consortium USAV Group; Pete Dugas, CEO of Atlanta-based integration and consulting firm TSAV; and Jeff Loether, president of Gaithersburg, Md.-based consulting firm Electro-Media Design.

The science: preparing a response
Schwarz, whose background includes work on multibillion-dollar proposals for the defense industry, says that as a first step, you need to consider the proposal an integral part of the project itself. For Schwarz, that means two things: 1) that the person writing the proposal has a clear understanding of the company's ability to deliver the work, and 2) that there's a methodology in place to make sure that the company has the resources to profitably complete the jobs it wins.

"There's a sacred triad of project management," he says. "Scope, schedule, and resources. What's the scope, what's the schedule, and what are the resources required to do it?"

Dugas, whose company builds higher-end AV systems in the United States and overseas, agrees. "A lot of factors go into the decision to bid," he says. "The biggest one is understanding your capacities. At TSAV, we're looking for projects that hit our sweet spot in terms of logistics, timeline, technology, and availability of people." When they do, he says he's not too worried about the margin he gets when he wins the bid. The profit is generally there.

Both Schwarz and Dugas agree that many of the RFPs they see are well-written, with requirements defined by an AV consultant or an educated owner. "If that's the case, your first priority is to answer the questions and provide what's required," Dugas says.

But there are times when the RFP is not complete or correct. "You have to do some kind of requirements or design review on every bid," Schwarz says. If you find flaws, you may add details about what you plan to provide, propose an alternative, or choose not to bid.

"Of course, if we find the RFP is incomplete and we're not comfortable bidding it as written, that's more of a challenge," Dugas says. You not only need to supply what's missing, but find a diplomatic way to do so.

These flaws can exist in any number of areas. "It's our responsibility, in many cases, to train the client in what they have to plan for," Dugas says. "We need access. We need a loading dock. We need the space to be heated or air conditioned for a certain amount of time before we get there. We have to specify what the electrical contractor will provide, what the voice contractor will provide, which ports will be open on the firewalls."

Loether, who was one of the authors of InfoComm's Audiovisual Best Practices, says he doesn't believe many consultants are offended by integrators who add qualifications or conditions to their bids. "A crucial factor for us is responsiveness; that is, the willingness to follow the directives and specifications in the RFP," he says. If it's apparent that you're working to better the project, bringing up a missing item is a good thing. "I need a team player," Loether adds. "I don't want to be in a superior/subordinate relationship. I think the contractor and design consultant should be working together to benefit the client."

While it's true that some consultants are less accommodating, overlooking a missing spec can have serious consequences. "In a way, you're betting your company on every big proposal," Schwarz says. For that reason, you want to keep management involved. "Everyone has, at minimum, an informal approval process, but to be successful, you need more discipline."

Dugas agrees. "We have a different model than most AV integrators," he says. At TSAV, one or more sales people and engineers work on every proposal, and at least one member of the management team reviews it before it goes out.

If the RFP does not already do so, Schwarz suggests breaking the project down not only by functional segments such as video, sound, or control, but by timing segments or milestones. These may include, for example, completion of engineering documents, delivery of equipment, and completion of programming. "Each of these milestones has to be something tangible that everyone can agree on, something you can test and ask the customer to sign off on," he says. Thinking in these terms can help you define the skills and resources needed to complete each phase of the project, help you keep the project on track once it has begun, and define points for progress billing.

"Another way to look at this is to create a schedule of values, where you define different segments of the job, the material and labor, and then bill when you reach certain percentages of completion," Dugas says. Though you see these mainly on larger projects following the American Institute of Architects (AIA)'s guidelines for process management, Dugas says this type of planning is a part of every large project at TSAV.

"[If you don't consider these kind of details,] you will find yourself asking your techs for heroic efforts during the installation," Schwarz says. "'We didn't know we were going to have to do this, but we'll just have to whip our techs to work from 10 p.m. to 5 a.m., because we can't get access during the day.'"

Dugas adds that, in many cases, "this is simple stuff, but we have to spell it out. We're the AV pros, after all. The client often is not."

When it comes to pricing the job, Schwarz suggests borrowing a method from government contractors called cost Basis of Estimate, or BOE. "The idea is to base your pricing on an historical database of past jobs," he says. "How long does it actually take your people to hang a projector?"

"Forensics is a big thing," Dugas says. "We routinely hold project closeout meetings and financial debriefings." Who the other bidders are is also important. One of the companies I used to work for kept very careful records of who won each bid and, as much as possible, calculated the markups they used.

"I suspect there's a definite correlation between the dealers who try to collect that type of information and those who are most profitable," Schwarz says.

In the end, what's most important to the person who will open your proposal? "Qualification is first," Loether says. "And next, it's responsiveness. Does the bidder show an understanding of the project and echo the priorities expressed in the RFP? Are any conditions or exceptions done in the spirit of wanting to help things, to benefit the client?" Price is very important, Loether says, but only after he's sure he has bidders who are qualified and responsive.

The science of preparing a bid, at least as we've defined it so far, has everything to do with responsiveness and price. The art, showing that you are well qualified to complete the project, is our topic for next month's "Marketing Mix."

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New technology helps Stroud students focus their journalism skills

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Mar 29, 2010 by Ryan Blackburn, The Athens Banner-Herald Watch out Wolf Blitzer. Move over Brian Williams. Students at Howard Stroud Elementary School now tell their own news stories in a TV studio that's part of $80,000 in technology additions at Stroud, J.J. Harris and Timothy elementary schools and Hilsman Middle School. Students...

Mar 29, 2010 by Ryan Blackburn, The Athens Banner-Herald

Watch out Wolf Blitzer. Move over Brian Williams.

Students at Howard Stroud Elementary School now tell their own news stories in a TV studio that's part of $80,000 in technology additions at Stroud, J.J. Harris and Timothy elementary schools and Hilsman Middle School.

Students at several schools in the Clarke County School District broadcast video announcements in classrooms each morning, but until now have used limited or outdated equipment to record their shows.
At Stroud, for instance, students had a single video camera and used felt thunderclouds or suns to spice up weather and other school news reports.

In the new studio, students work with three cameras, sound and audio mixers, portable microphones, teleprompters, graphics generators, lighting kits and a green screen.

"It's changed a lot," said Summer Crawford, a fifth-grader at Stroud who started anchoring the morning announcements in the fall. "We've got many gadgets, and it feels professional because we're in a larger room, and (the equipment) doesn't break down."

The equipment is up-to-date but not so technical that students can't learn how to put together a pretty good show, said Martin Kohnen, vice president for Technical Services Audio Visual, the company that sold and installed the equipment for the school district.

"Any standard newscast that you see, they can do the same things," Kohnen said. "They can do weather reports. They can go out in the field and do field interviews. Really, the sky's kind of the limit. It's really up to their imagination of what they can do."

Each day, as many as six Stroud students scramble into position, make microphone and camera checks, scan scripts one last time, then beam a live show to classrooms around the school.

"They're running the studio," Principal Toni Pickett said. "We train them, but they are at the point now where they really are running the studio."

Some students control the volume on a mixing board, while others cue the anchor to speak louder or scoot over for a better camera shot, while others wait to change camera angles or go to a graphic.
There's much to do in a small window of time, and each person's job is important. If someone forgets to turn on a microphone or accidentally pushes the wrong button, the whole school knows.

"They have this big responsibility to try and get it right," said Dera Weaver, a media specialist at Stroud who supervises the school's studio and morning broadcasts.

The chance to push big buttons, control the lights or be on television hooks students at first, but they soon learn there's a lot more to it than pressing buttons and smiling into the camera.

"The most important thing is how these tools are teaching them to think," Weaver said. "They're learning how to improvise, to fix problems as the problems are happening, to rely on each other and to evaluate their own performance daily to see what they could have done better."

The experience also might generate interest in a field students otherwise wouldn't have considered.

"It's about exposure," Pickett said. "You never know who is going to latch onto it."

Students may one day use the equipment to record video reports or expand on what they are learning in class, Weaver said.

"I think it's limitless," she said. "I don't think we know all of the questions to ask yet – there's so many possibilities."

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NSCA Integrated System of the Week

MPB Gross Anatomy Lab 019

Feb 15, 2010 by TSAV Staff The University of Georgia and Medical College of Georgia asked TSAVto help convert the Historic Athens Cotton and Wool Mill (c1857) into an advanced medical teaching facility with special attention given to historic preservation. The implementation of a content capture and enterprise streaming media system,...

Feb 15, 2010 by TSAV Staff

The University of Georgia and Medical College of Georgia asked TSAVto help convert the Historic Athens Cotton and Wool Mill (c1857) into an advanced medical teaching facility with special attention given to historic preservation. The implementation of a content capture and enterprise streaming media system, Distance Learning Classrooms, anatomy lab with digital recording and broadcast to lecture halls transformed the historic space into a state of the art 21st century learning environment. TSAV's solutions have been implemented in educational and presentation environments throughout the USA and in the Middle East.

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The Classic Center Gets a First-Class Line Array System with NEXO GEO S 12 Series

classic-center

Jul 8, 2009 by Lisa Young, Sound and Video Contractor Located in the heart of downtown Athens, Georgia, The Grand Hall at the Classic Center was built as a meeting, special events and performing arts venue providing entertainment, unique dining opportunities and programs for all interests. Recently, Technical Services Audio Visual...

Jul 8, 2009 by Lisa Young, Sound and Video Contractor

Located in the heart of downtown Athens, Georgia, The Grand Hall at the Classic Center was built as a meeting, special events and performing arts venue providing entertainment, unique dining opportunities and programs for all interests. Recently, Technical Services Audio Visual (TSAV) of Athens installed a NEXO GEO S12 line array system as the primary audio system for performance events in The Grand Hall. The Grand Hall can seat 3,175, and for the very largest crowds, the system may be augmented with near fills for the area directly in front of the stage.

"Until now, the only installed sound in the room was an overhead 70v system for background music and paging," states TSAV's Steve Gore. "Previously, the Center had to use a crew to rig a system whenever a live performance event took place, which limited the practical and economical use of the space. Because The Grand Hall is reconfigured weekly for a variety of events including concerts, trade shows, and church services, it's not possible to permanently place ground stacked speaker arrays. The room is also acoustically challenging with a high ceiling main hall and a low balcony in the rear with glass enclosed meeting rooms on top."

A decision was made to install eight NEXO GEO S1210 speakers as the mains, two GEO S1230s as down fills, four NEXO RS15-P subs and three NXAMP 4×1 processors. "The NEXO GEO S12 and RS15 arrays provided us the predictable and flexible coverage pattern we needed to fly three arrays (left, right, and center cardioid sub) high enough so as not to interfere with room reconfiguration and allowing for clean sight lines when the front of house is not the primary focal point of the event, says Gore. The system provides direct coverage only where needed: the event floor."

"Using NEXO GeoSoft 2 software to model the room and calculate the speaker configuration and placement, and the NXAMP 4×1 controllers to steer the cardioid sub pattern down to the floor, we were able to complete a challenging installation without resorting to the old 'well, let's try it and see how it sounds' mentality, Gore adds. The fidelity, complete coverage, and volume levels available with this system will allow The Grand Hall to be used for a wider range of events that may not have been practical before, with greatly decreased set up time."

"From rock concerts to church services, we have a lot of customers who are making good use of the new sound system in The Grand Hall," notes Paul Cramer, Executive Director of The Classic Center. "It's a great addition to our facility, allowing us to serve our clients at a totally new level. We are already seeing many benefits. Shortly after the NEXO system was installed, our community was treated to the annual Athens Symphony Pops Concert Series, and we received many comments on the quality of the sound and how much the audience appreciated the new system."

Cramer also mentioned that a large church group meets at the venue, and when they need to use The Grand Hall, the new NEXOsystem will provide high-quality audio for services. "Having the system available in-house will add a level of convenience that we are pleased to offer our customers."

For more information on TSAV, visit www. tsav.com.

For more information on the NEXO GEO S12 system or NXAMP, visit www.yamahaca.com.

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Where Future Stars Are Born: Writing and Recording at the Boys and Girls Club

BoysAndGirlsClub-Drummer

Jun 10, 2009 by Michelle Gilzenrat, Flagpole Magazine "The music business is so much like pro sports," suggests Bruce Burch of the UGA Music Business Program, "in that it's hard to break into. You can't learn about the music business too young, in my opinion…" While aspiring athletes have little league teams and P.E. classes to help...

Jun 10, 2009 by Michelle Gilzenrat, Flagpole Magazine

"The music business is so much like pro sports," suggests Bruce Burch of the UGA Music Business Program, "in that it's hard to break into. You can't learn about the music business too young, in my opinion…"

While aspiring athletes have little league teams and P.E. classes to help them get in the game at a very young age, rock stars in the making have had to settle for piano recitals and marching bands at best. That is, until now.

There is a new trend in children's activity programming, and it is driven by music composition, recording and performance.

Mike Hackett, president and chief officer of the Boys and Girls Club in Athens, has worked with Boys and Girls Clubs for nearly 25 years. "I'm amazed," he says. "I can't recall a time when kids were as interested in music and dance as they are right now."

So, when plans were underway to build the expansive new club on Fourth Street, which also features vibrant construction, an oversize basketball court, game rooms, study centers, computer labs and more, the addition of a recording studio became a top priority, particularly for the teen center.

"When we first came up with this concept, what we were looking for was a cool space that would attract teenagers," says Hackett. "In other Boys and Girls Clubs in Georgia they have converted old classrooms into studios for kids and it's become very popular… but once we started planning it and certain people got involved like Pete Dugas over at TSAV and Bruce Burch and Keith Perissi… it's grown into an entity of its own. I've got a feeling that this whole studio is going to become bigger than what I ever envisioned it to be."

Unlike the converted rooms found at most youth clubs, this space was designed from the beginning to function as a professional studio.

"The biggest investment has been in the space itself," says Hackett. "We've probably spent $85,000 just to upgrade the physical space." The room has its own A/C controls, floating wood floor, double thick walls, baffling and more to ensure acoustic integrity. In this cozy, quiet haven you'd never believe 50 basketballs were thumping on the pavement just on the other side of the wall.

As for the actual design and installation of the studio, local company TSAV has offered its services free of charge. Ed Macgrueder at Musician's Warehouse has also been very supportive of the project, and Pete Dugas at TSAV says Macgrueder has donated a "significant portion of the costs associated with outfitting the studio with instruments. The basic equipment such as drums, guitar, bass and keys are already in place, and soon TSAV will be wiring and mounting monitors, mixing boards and recording equipment in the control room.

The goals of this project are multi-faceted, and the possibilities are limitless. Hackett hopes the studio will diversify club membership by attracting creative children who are interested in other things besides athletics. He also hopes to provide a safe haven where members can express themselves creatively, and he envisions the studio becoming a place of learning.

"Our kids have a lot of natural ability, but very few of them have formal musical training. One of the things I've always wanted from the get-go was the opportunity for them to learn music. You can make music now without knowing anything about music: hit the auto-rhythm button and the auto-melody button, that sort of thing…" Hackett says the emphasis in this studio will be on more organic composition that encompasses all genres and all aspects of the industry.

"One of the things we are very excited about is the partnership with the Music Business Program. Keith and Bruce are going to send their students over and they are going to do like a Junior Achievement model with the kids where they'll start up their own recording label. So, some kids might be the performers, others might learn the engineering, other kids might be involved in promotions and marketing and that sort of stuff. So, right now we have all these ideas and all these resources, and we are trying to find a way to mash it all together. I have just been blown away by how many people from the music community have come in and said, 'We want to help!'"

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Sennheiser Mini-shotgun Points TSAV in a New Direction

Sennheiserhall1 1

Jan 30, 2007 by Millimeter Staff Sometimes a piece of professional audio equipment comes along that, although only a small component, can be the key to the successful performance of an entire system. For Georgia-based Technical Services Audio Visual (TSAV), that item is Sennheiser's gooseneck-mounting ME 36 mini-shotgun microphone...

Jan 30, 2007 by Millimeter Staff

Sometimes a piece of professional audio equipment comes along that, although only a small component, can be the key to the successful performance of an entire system. For Georgia-based Technical Services Audio Visual (TSAV), that item is Sennheiser's gooseneck-mounting ME 36 mini-shotgun microphone capsule, which has had a profound impact on the company's audio system designs, according to president Pete Dugas.

"That microphone has allowed for change in our approach to sound system design in a lot of applications," reports Dugas, whose professional audio-visual consulting, contracting, and integration company has been in operation since 1991. "When I'm working in a highly reverberant environment or a situation where there are a lot of novice users and operators, I go to this mic."

The Sennheiser ME 36 is a back-electret condenser microphone head that, mounted on the MZH 3015 gooseneck, offers an unobtrusive and highly directional solution to the challenges presented by a wide range of speech applications. For Dugas andTSAV, the discovery of the mini-shotgun microphone, which incorporates the proven ME 105 capsule from Sennheiser's series of modular lavaliere products, has been close to a life-changing experience.

In particular, he says, the supercardioid pattern ME 36 is often the only solution for certain voice-only applications. "In speech reinforcement systems where the system is designed for constricted bandwidth it's perfect. Not that the bandwidth of the mic is constricted, but I can adjust it to the point where the gain before feedback ratios are astronomically different than they are in a traditional condenser microphone in that sort of application."

That has allowed TSAV to implement trouble-free speech reinforcement in venues where the loudspeaker placement is far from ideal. For example, offers Dugas, "We used them in a '70s-era convention hall at the University of Georgia. The speaker cluster had been hung low over the stage in order to shoot back into an area at the rear of the room and the distance from the presenter's position to the cluster was 16ft. The speakers were lobing a little bit, and the only way for us to get gain before feedback ratios that worked in most public speaking setups [short of correcting the loudspeaker system design, which was cost prohibitive for the project] was to use the ME 36."

TSAV installed a digital front-end to the system so that a preset could be selected for full-bandwidth music applications. "But when it was a speech-only situation and you had novice speakers, you would use the Sennheiser microphone, click to another preset and it would bring up a limited bandwidth setup," Dugas explains.

Similarly, he says, at the 180-year-old St. Joseph's Catholic Church in Macon, Ga., which has the highest dome on the east coast south of Virginia and a RT60 measurement of just over five seconds, the ME 36 handled the close proximity to the loudspeakers with ease. "The line arrays are about 3 1/2ft. from the microphones. They're throwing 120ft. So at the microphone, the sound pressure level is 88dB in order to provide for adequate levels at the back of the room. And the speaker has a 160-degree horizontal dispersion. You put any other microphone up there and it would be difficult to make it work. It's a great mic."

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TSAV Uses Sennheiser Mini-Shotgun Mic for Speech Reinforcement

logo

Dec 28, 2006 by Mix Magazine Staff According Pete Dugas, president of Athens, Georgia–based Technical Services Audio Visual (TSAV), Sennheiser's gooseneck-mounting ME 36 mini-shotgun microphone capsule has impacted the company's audio system designs. "That microphone has allowed for change in our approach to sound system design in a...

Dec 28, 2006 by Mix Magazine Staff

According Pete Dugas, president of Athens, Georgia–based Technical Services Audio Visual (TSAV), Sennheiser's gooseneck-mounting ME 36 mini-shotgun microphone capsule has impacted the company's audio system designs.

"That microphone has allowed for change in our approach to sound system design in a lot of applications," says Dugas, whose professional audio-visual consulting, contracting and integration company has been in operation since 1991. "When I'm working in a highly reverberant environment or a situation where there are a lot of novice users and operators, I go to this mic."

The Sennheiser ME 36 is a back-electret condenser microphone head mounted on the MZH 3015 gooseneck that offers a supercardioid pattern for a wide range of speech applications. The ME 36 also incorporates the ME 105 capsule from Sennheiser's series of modular lavalier products.

"In speech reinforcement systems where the system is designed for constricted bandwidth, it's perfect," Dugas says. "Not that the bandwidth of the mic is constricted, but I can adjust it to the point where the gain before feedback ratios are astronomically different than they are in a traditional condenser microphone in that sort of application."

That has allowed TSAV to implement trouble-free speech reinforcement in venues where the loudspeaker placement is far from ideal. For example, offers Dugas, "We used them in a '70s-era convention hall at the University of Georgia [pictured]. The speaker cluster had been hung low over the stage in order to shoot back into an area at the rear of the room, and the distance from the presenter's position to the cluster was 16 feet. The speakers were 'lobing' a little bit, and the only way for us to get gain before feedback ratios that worked in most public speaking setups—short of correcting the loudspeaker system design, which was cost prohibitive for the project—was to use the ME 36."

TSAV installed a digital front-end to the system so that a preset could be selected for full-bandwidth music applications. "But when it was a speech-only situation and you had novice speakers, you would use the Sennheiser microphone, click to another preset and it would bring up a limited bandwidth setup," Dugas explains.

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Who We Are

We believe that our work empowers institutions to empower individuals. Through technology enhanced experiences, those affected by our work may see the world in a new light. As worldwide leaders in technology, process,...

We believe that our work empowers institutions to empower individuals.  Through technology enhanced experiences, those affected by our work may see the world in a new light.


As worldwide leaders in technology, process, partner integration, and organizational structure, TSAV's focus on the missions of our clients provides for clear direction in the midst of what are often complex initiatives. In short, we build "Experiences" that amplify the core values of our clients and that factor the realities of economics & human resources. 

From visioning to funding to boots on the ground, we explore the possibilities derived from innovative design practices. We magnify the impact of the message, sometimes through amplification and sometimes through streamlining, refinement, and method. TSAV is a full-service technology consulting firm specializing in Visioning, Funding Structures, Roadmapping, CAPEX/OPEX/ROI quantification, Infrastructure design, Program Management, Consulting, Integration, & Support. We offer full lifecycle services from visioning to realization and beyond.  We work with global leaders in their fields in focus areas including the following:

  • Visioning & Mission Alignment
  • Technology Master Planning
  • Technology Project Planning
  • Impact and Collateral Effect Planning
  • Cost Analysis & Management
  • Infrastructure Analysis & Development
  • Facilities Design Collaboration
  • Systems Calibration
  • Systems Design
  • Commissioning & Verification
  • Education
  • Maintenance & Support Programming
  • Sound Consulting


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Our History

Since its inception in 1991, Technical Services (TSAV) has grown its client base through repeated quality completions of coherent, well-designed projects while maintaining those relationships through excellent service and support. We work with national and international businesses and organizations,...

Since its inception in 1991, Technical Services (TSAV)  has grown its client base through repeated quality completions of coherent, well-designed projects while maintaining those relationships through excellent service and support. We work with national and international businesses and organizations, including clients in the Americas, Europe, and the Middle East.  Our roles are as varied as our clients and not restricted to a given vertical.   And our experience across a variety of sectors affords us unparalleled insight and opportunity for creative, strategic, and tactical engagement.  Our clients including Governments & Quasi Governmental Entities, foreign Ministries & Multinational Conglomerates, Sports and Entertainment icons, Cultural Endeavors, Transportation Leaders, Technology & Research Organizations, Educational Institutions, and others. 



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Leadership

Solutions

At TSAV, we believe that our work can facilitate empowerment and enhance delivery of our clients’ messages . In short, we facilitate communication through leading technology related projects. We explore the possibilities derived from innovative design practices. We magnify the impact of the message, sometimes through...


At TSAV, we believe that our work can facilitate empowerment and enhance delivery of our clients’ messages . In short, we facilitate communication through leading technology related projects.  We explore the possibilities derived from innovative design practices. We magnify the impact of the message, sometimes through amplification and sometimes through streamlining, refinement, and method. TSAV is a full-service professional communications technology consulting firm specializing in technology roadmapping, ROI quantification, infrastructure design, project management, consulting, integration, programming, service and support for AV, IT, and technology projects. We work with clients worldwide in focus areas including the following:

  • Technology Master Planning
  • Technology Project Planning
  • Impact and Collateral Effect of Technology Plan
  • Cost Management and ROI
  • Sponsor/Partner Development
  • Infrastructure Development
  • Facility Design Collaboration
  • Systems Design
  • Systems Configuration & Calibration
  • Operational Support & Service Level Agreement
  • Maintenance & Support Programming
  • Training


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U.S. HEADQUARTERS Phone +1.706.613.8759 Fax +1.706.243.4940 info@tsav.com

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